Tag Archives: Tips

The heat is on, in the Cleveland!

The heat is on in Cleveland! Here are seven tips to keep you cool, and save money!

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Filed under City of Cleveland, Cleveland Public Power, Energy Efficiency

What to do if your power goes out

Live wires

NEVER touch downed power lines. Photo Credit: City of Cleveland Photo Bureau

This weekend Cleveland Public Power experienced a few outages affecting about one thousand customers. The problem this weekend was unpreventable, but we are happy to note that as soon as we had isolated the problem, our crews worked quickly to restore power.

With high winds today and forecasters predicting more rain and possible thunderstorms we are providing information on what you can do when you lose power, not only to safeguard you, but also to help us get your service restored as quickly as possible.

The first order of business is to call our Trouble line at 216.664.3156 to let us know you do not have power. When making this call, be patient because just like you – your neighbors may be calling as well, resulting in busy signals or longer than usual waits for someone to answer.

Second, it is always good to have a traditional landline that just plugs into the telephone jack. As much as we all love  cordless telephones if your electric service is interrupted and these are the only telephones you have you will be without telephone service. Cellular phones are great too – but if you haven’t charged it in recently you will soon be without it as well.

If you are having still having difficulty reporting your outage you can post a message on our Facebook page  found here or send a tweet to @clepublicpower. We monitor these sites frequently during inclement weather.

Now for tips to keep you and your family safe:

  • Downed power lines – Never touch, move or go near any downed or hanging lines. The first action is to call 9-1-1 or your local utility. CPP’s Trouble Line number is 216-664-3156.
    • Do not put your feet in water where a downed line is laying
    • Do not try to move tree limbs
    • If you see someone who has come into contact with a downed line, do not touch them, again call 9-1-1
    • If a line comes down on your car stay inside, roll down your window and warn others to stay away. Call authorities or ask a passerby to call authorities. The only time you should exit a vehicle with a downed line on it is if it has caught fire. If the vehicle is on fire, open the door and jump with both feet together to avoid contact with the car. It is metal and therefore you could receive a shock.
  • Power outage and food safety – Unless there is a major outage extending more than 4 hours, your food should be safe in the refrigerator as long as you leave the doors closed. After that point you may want to begin to prepare and/or eat the food.
  • Food in the freezer will hold much longer. According to the USDA, “a full freezer will hold the temperature for approximately 48 hours (24 hours if it is half full) if the door remains closed.”
  • If it appears the outage will last for a prolonged period of time, the USDA advises obtaining dry ice or block ice to keep the refrigerator cold. The USDA reports “fifty pounds of dry ice should hold an 18-cubic foot full freezer for 2 days.”

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Filed under City of Cleveland, Cleveland Public Power, Power Lines, Power Outage, Safety

Tips on Preventing Illness after a natural disaster

As the City of Cleveland and Cuyahoga County begin to recover from the effects of Hurricane Sandy, the City of Cleveland and Cuyahoga County Office of Emergency Management has issued the following tips:

KEEP FOOD AND DRINKING WATER SAFE

  • Discard any perishable food (like meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and leftovers) that have been above 40 °F for over 2 hours.
  • For the refrigerator: Pack milk, other dairy products, meat, fish, eggs, gravy, and spoilable leftovers into a cooler surrounded by ice. Inexpensive styrofoam coolers are fine for this purpose.
  • A freezer that is half full will hold food safely for up to 24 hours. A full freezer will hold food safely for 48 hours. Do not open the freezer door unless necessary.
  • Listen to and follow public health and safety announcements.

PREVENT CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING

  • Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas that can cause sudden illness and death if you breathe it. Never use generators, pressure washers, grills, camp stoves, or other gasoline, propane, natural gas, or charcoal-burning devices inside your home, basement, garage, or camper—or even outside near an open window, door, or vent.
  • Don’t heat your house with a gas oven.
  • If you are too hot or too cold, or you need to prepare food, don’t put yourself and your family at risk of CO poisoning—look to friends, family, or a community shelter for help.
  • If your CO detector sounds, leave your home immediately and call 911.
  • Seek prompt medical attention if you suspect CO poisoning and are feeling dizzy, light-headed, or nauseated.
  • For further guidance on avoiding CO poisoning, go to http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/carbonmonoxide.asp.

CLEAN UP SAFELY AFTER FLOODS

  • To prevent illness, disinfect and dry buildings and items in them. This will prevent growth of some bacteria, viruses, mold, and mildew that can cause illness.
  • For more information, go to http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/cleanup.asp

ANIMAL AND INSECT-RELATED HAZARDS

  • Avoid wild or stray animals and biting or stinging insects.
  • Call local authorities to handle animals.
  • Dispose of dead animals, according to local guidelines, as soon as you can.
  • For more information, contact your local animal shelter or services, a veterinarian, or the Humane Society for advice on dealing with pets or stray or wild animals after an emergency.
  • For information on specific animal and insect issues, see go to http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/animalhazards.asp.

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Filed under City of Cleveland, City of Cleveland and Cuyahoga County Office of Emergency Management, Cleveland Public Power, Hurricane Sandy