Tag Archives: Electrical Safety

Keeping Warm, while saving energy

Icy Lake

This weekends weather will not match the polar vortex we experienced two years ago and pictured here. But it might feel that way after the mild winter we have been experiencing. (Photo by Shelley M. Shockley)

This winter has been rather mild, but over the next several days unseasonable highs will quickly transform into typical northeast Ohio January lows.

As you plan for the days ahead we thought this would be a good time to share some basic safety principles and energy saving tips.

The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) offers the following tips to keep you safe as you begin bringing out heaters:

  • Keep all furniture, draperies, and other household objects, at least, three feet from the in-wall fan heaters and 12 inches from baseboard heaters. Keep portable space heaters, at least, three feet way from all flammable materials.
  • Plug portable space heaters directly into the outlet; do not use an extension cord.
  • If an in-wall or baseboard heater is shut off at the circuit breaker, be sure to lock or tag the circuit breaker to prevent someone from inadvertently turning it back on.

Fireplace Safety

Fireplaces can be romantic and cozy yet they can be extremely hazardous if you do not exercise proper caution.  The most important step is to be certain that your fireplace was constructed for actual use, not just for decoration.  If installing a factory-made fireplace, make sure that you have adequate heat barriers and you aren’t putting it near anything combustible.

If you plan on using your fireplace regularly, you should have your chimney cleaned annually, and ensure that it is clear of leaves, pine needles and any other debris.  You should never use flammable liquids to ignite a fire, nor burn any cardboard, trash or debris in your fireplace.  Always use a screen around the fireplace to keep sparks from flying out.  Never leave your fire unattended, and be certain the flames are completely out before retiring for the night or whenever leaving the house.  Always keep a fire extinguisher on hand, and place smoke alarms on every level of your home.  By following these handy tips you should be able to enjoy a warm cozy winter in front of your fireplace, and save on your heating bill.

Energy Saving Tips:

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF HEAT FROM THE SUN

Open curtains on your south-facing windows during the day to allow sunlight to naturally heat your home, and close them at night to reduce the chill you may feel from cold windows.

COVER DRAFTY WINDOWS

Use a heavy-duty, clear plastic sheet on a frame or tape clear plastic film to the inside of your window frames during the cold winter months. Make sure the plastic is sealed tightly to the frame to help reduce infiltration.

Install tight-fitting, insulating drapes or shades on windows that feel drafty after weatherizing. Find out about other window treatments and coverings that can improve energy efficiency.

ADJUST THE TEMPERATURE

When you are home and awake, set your thermostat as low as is comfortable. When you are asleep or out of the house, turn your thermostat back 10° to 15° for eight hours and save around 10% a year on your heating and cooling bills. A programmable thermostat can make it easy to set back your   temperature. Find out how to operate your thermostat for maximum energy savings.

FIND AND SEAL LEAKS

Seal the air leaks around utility cut-throughs for pipes (“plumbing penetrations”), gaps around chimneys and recessed lights in insulated ceilings, and unfinished spaces behind cupboards and closets.

Find out how to detect air leaks. Learn more about air sealing new and existing homes. Add caulk or weatherstripping to seal air leaks around leaky doors and windows. Find out how to select and apply the appropriate caulk. Learn how to select and apply weatherstripping.

MAINTAIN YOUR HEATING SYSTEMS

Schedule service for your heating system.

Find out what maintenance is required to keep your heating system operating efficiently.

Furnaces: Replace your furnace filter once a month or as needed. Find out more about maintaining your furnace or boiler.

Wood- and Pellet-Burning Heaters: Clean the flue vent regularly and clean the inside of the appliance with a wire brush periodically to ensure that your home is heated efficiently.

Find other maintenance recommendations for wood- and pellet-burning appliances.

 FOR THE FIREPLACE

  • Keep your fireplace damper closed unless a fire is burning. Keeping the damper open is like keeping a window wide open during the winter; it allows warm air to go right up the chimney.
  • When you use the fireplace, reduce heat loss by opening dampers in the bottom of the firebox (if provided) or open the nearest window slightly–approximately 1 inch–and close doors leading into the room. Lower the thermostat setting to between 50° and 55°F.
  • If you never use your fireplace, plug and seal the chimney flue.
  • If you do use the fireplace, install tempered glass doors and a heat-air exchange system that blows warmed air back into the room.
  • Check the seal on the fireplace flue damper and make it as snug as possible.
  • Purchase grates made of C-shaped metal tubes to draw cool room air into the fireplace and circulate warm air back into the room.
  • Add caulking around the fireplace hearth.

 

 

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City of Cleveland, CPP celebrate National Electric Safety Month

Proclamation---2015-Electric-Safety-Month-electronic

Cleveland Mayor Frank G. Jackson has designated the month of May, 2015 as Electric Safety Month. To raise awareness on the many electrical safety hazards that residents can prevent, Cleveland Public Power will utilize its social media platforms to promote tips that will aid in keeping residents and customers safe.

CPP is following the leader of The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI), which is dedicated exclusively to promoting electrical safety in the home, school and workplace through education, awareness and advocacy.

The ESFI reports that annually there are 418 civilian deaths related to electrical home structure fires. The financial impact of these fires amounts to more than $1.4 billion annually, and more than six people are electrocuted weekly in the United States.

We encourage you to check back throughout the month to learn how you can keep your family safe!

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Winter 2014: Electric Safety Tips

CLE was hit with a lake effect snow yesterday and today. (Photo by Shelley M. Shockley)

CLE was hit with a lake effect snow yesterday and today. (Photo by Shelley M. Shockley)

Winter came in with a bang this week, and most of us aren’t prepared for the cold and snow. To aid you in your preparations here are some tips to keep you safe and warm.  The cold weather prompts concern and Cleveland residents should be cognizant of the fact that the majority of electrical fires take place in the winter months.

Downed power lines – Never touch, move or go near any downed or hanging lines. The first action should be to call 9-1-1 or your local utility. CPP’s Trouble Line is 216-664-3156.

  • Do not put your feet in water or snow where a downed line is laying
  • Do not try to move tree limbs
  • If you see someone who has come into contact with a downed line, do not touch them, again call 9-1-1
  • If a line comes down on your car stay inside, roll down your window and warn others to stay away. Call authorities or ask a passerby to call authorities. The only time you should exit a vehicle with a downed line on it is if it has caught fire. If the vehicle is on fire, open the door and jump with both feet together to avoid contact with the car. It is metal and you could receive a shock.

Power outage and food safety – Unless there is a major outage extending more than 4 hours, your food should be safe in the refrigerator as long as you leave the doors closed. After that point you may want to begin to prepare and/or eat the food.

Food in the freezer will hold much longer. According to the USDA, “a full freezer will hold the temperature for approximately 48 hours (24 hours if it is half full) if the door remains closed.”

If it appears the outage will last for a prolonged period of time, the USDA advises obtaining dry ice or block ice to keep the refrigerator cold. The USDA reports “fifty pounds of dry ice should hold an 18-cubic foot full freezer for 2 days.”

 In Home Tips

If you must use space heaters to keep warm, ensure that they are plugged directly into an outlet, do not plug them into extension cords.

Keep all furniture, draperies, flammable materials, and other household objects at least three feet from your space heater.

  • Always unplug your electric blanket when not in use.
  • If an in-wall or baseboard heater is shut off at the circuit breaker, be sure to lock or tag the circuit breaker to prevent someone else from turning it back on.
  • Because it is common for portable heaters and electric blankets to be recalled, make sure you check your brand and model to ensure that your particular heater or blanket has not been subject to and product recalls.
  • Never ever purchase a counterfeit electrical product because they have not met any of the testing or safety standards and they can be extremely hazardous.

By following this safety advice, you should have a warm cozy and safe winter season.  Additionally, be sure to check the batteries in your smoke detector as well as your carbon monoxide detector.

In the event of widespread outages customers will also be able to follow updates as well as report outages on Twitter, by following @clepublicpower on http://www.twitter.com.

 

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Electrical safety for cold weather months!

If you haven’t already noticed, winter is quickly approaching and the cold air is sneaking into your home trying to freeze you out.  With that being said… everyone is trying to stay warm, while trying to save some money at the same time.  The cold weather prompts concern and Cleveland residents should be cognizant of the fact that the majority of electrical fires take place in the winter months.

In 2012 the City of Cleveland Fire Department reported 216 fires with an electrical origin. Some of the contributing factors in these fires are electric blankets, space heaters, over exerting power strips and/or extension cords, and the use of counterfeit electrical products that have not met safety standards.

When using these items you should follow these safety tips:

  • Always unplug your electric blanket when not in use.
  • Keep all furniture, draperies, flammable materials, and other household objects at least three feet from your space heater.
  • Plug portable space heaters directly into the outlet – DO NOT USE AN EXTENSION CORD!
  • If an in-wall or baseboard heater is shut off at the circuit breaker, be sure to lock or tag the circuit breaker to prevent someone else from turning it back on.
  • Because it is common for portable heaters and electric blankets to be recalled, make sure you check your brand and model to ensure that your particular heater or blanket has not been subject to and product recalls.
  • Never ever purchase a counterfeit electrical product because they have not met any of the testing or safety standards and they can be extremely hazardous.

By following this safety advice, you should have a warm cozy and safe winter season.  Additionally, be sure to check the batteries in your smoke detector.

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